'68
$12.95 $9.72
  • Paperback
  • 136
  • January 2004
  • 9781583226087

'68

Paco Ignacio Taibo II

Translated by Donald Nicholson-Smith

On the night of October 2, 1968, there occurred a bloody showdown between student demonstrators and the Mexican government in Tlatelolco Square. At least two hundred students were shot dead and many more were detained. Then the bodies were trucked out, the cobblestones were washed clean. Detainees were held without recourse until 1971.

Official denial of the killing continues even today: In the first week of February 2003, Mexico's Education Secretary Reyes Tamiz ordered a new history textbook that mentions the massacre-Claudia Sierra's History of Mexico: An Analytical Approach-removed from shelves and classrooms. (Public outcry led Tamiz to reverse his decision days later.) No one has yet been held accountable for the official acts of savagery.

With provocative, anecdotal, and analytical prose, Taibo claims for history "one more of the many unredeemed and sleepless ghosts that live in our lands."

REVIEWS 

"As the impact of the student revolt in Paris in May 1968 reverberated throughout the world and governments became increasingly reactive, 200 protesting students were murdered in Tlatelolco Square by government military police, and hundreds more were arrested and jailed. In the days and weeks following, the corpses of the slain students disappeared, the facts were contorted by government-controlled media, and reality turned to myth. Today, over 35 years later, much of the truth remains uncovered, but Taibo’s memoir goes a long way toward setting the record straight." —Publisher's Weekly 

About Paco Ignacio Taibo II

Born in Gijón, Spain, Paco Ignoacio Taibo II has lived in Mexico City since 1958, when his family fled Spanish fascism. His numerous literary honors include two Dashiell Hammett prizes, one Planeta prize for the best historical novel, and the Bancarella Prize for his biography of Che Guevara.

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