Camelia, Save Yourself by Telling the Truth: A Memoir of Iran
  • $23.95 $17.96
    • Paperback
    • 256
    • July 2008
    • 9781583227190
  • $23.95 $17.96
    • Hardcover
    • 256
    • March 2007
    • 9781583227190

Camelia, Save Yourself by Telling the Truth: A Memoir of Iran

Camelia Entekhabifard

Translated by George Mürer

Camelia Entekhabifard was six years old in 1979 when the shah of Iran was overthrown by revolutionary supporters of the Ayatollah Khomeini. By the age of sixteen, Camelia was a nationally celebrated poet, and at eighteen she was one of the youngest reformist journalists in Tehran. Just eight years later she was imprisoned, held in solitary confinement, and charged with breaching national security and challenging the authority of the Islamic regime. Camelia is both a story of growing up in post-revolutionary Tehran and a haunting reminder of the consequences of speaking the truth in a repressive society.

REVIEWS

"Enlightening … riveting … Entekhabifard brings unique courage and insight to her practice of journalism, for which she and her family have paid a dear price." —Booklist

"[B]ooks like this remind us that literature remains one of our most potent—and poignant—means of expression." —Kirkus

"A courageous book by a gifted journalist … a must-read for anyone concerned with the current Iranian predicament, women's rights, or the plight of journalists in authoritarian states." —Afshin Molavi

"In this psychologically complex and morally controversial autobiography, Camelia takes the reader on a surreal tour of post-revolutionary Iran, where under harsh medieval laws (much harsher for women) the 'children of the revolution' … do almost anything for a breath of fresh air—for freedom." —Farnoosh Moshiri

"Camelia's courage is a symbol of humanity's hope under the worst kind of oppression. A heart-stopping story that you will not be able to put down … This book will take your breath away." —Ahmad Rashid

About Camelia Entekhabifard

CAMELIA ENTEKHABIFARD was born in Tehran in 1973. While in high school and university, she became active as an emerging poet and painter. She then turned to journalism, writing for a number of papers, including the leading reformist daily, Zan [Woman]. In 1999 she was arrested for her journalistic activities and spent three months in prison. Upon her release, she came to the United States as a student and political refugee. Since then, she has reported on Iranian and Afghan affairs for AP, Reuters, Eurasia Net, the Village Voice, and Mother Jones. Currently, she spends much of her time reporting from Afghanistan.

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