Exercise Will Hurt You
$22.95 $17.21
  • Hardcover
  • 224
  • November 4, 2014
  • 9781609805357

Exercise Will Hurt You

Steve Barrer

A doctor's case for moderation in running, cycling, skiing, and other things we do because we think our bodies are invincible.

When was it decided that exercise could only be good for you? Leading neurosurgeon Dr. Steve Barrer argues--based on an extensive career treating exercise-related injuries, a cornucopia of his own personal injuries from exercise over the years, and ample scientific data--that we ought to change the way we think about exercise in the United States.

Instead of succumbing to what Barrer calls "the cult of exercise" that follows the mantra "no pain, no gain," how about some common sense? Pain is the body's way of telling us to stop. In a clear, friendly, and compelling voice, Barrer surveys exercise and sports that are commonly practiced--yoga, boxing, football, hockey, soccer, skiing--and informs the reader knowledgeably and conscientiously about the injuries that can result.
We've come to believe that the body can handle the abuse that comes with these sports, but it can't. Before we get carried away with the culture of excess that has been assigned to exercise in this country, let's remember that exercise is not always good for you, and make sure that our young people don't get the wrong idea from the model that's been set: no, your body is not invincible and yes, exercise can truly hurt you.

About Steve Barrer

DR. STEVEN J. BARRER, MD is currently Director of the Neurosciences Institute and Chief of the Division of Neurosurgery at Abington Memorial Hospital in Philadelphia. Dr. Barrer was named among the “Top Docs” in Philadelphia Magazine from 2009–2012 and has published numerous journal articles and papers in his area of expertise, neurosurgery. He is involved in educating medical students and residents, holds a position on the clinical faculty of Temple University School of Medicine in Philadelphia and is frequently invited as a guest speaker for his patient-centered passion, wisdom and wit. 

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