Howard Zinn on War
$16.95 $12.71
  • Paperback
  • 272
  • June 2011
  • 9781609801335

Howard Zinn on War

Howard Zinn

Revised and Updated Edition

This second edition of Howard Zinn on War is a collection of twenty-six short writings chosen by the author to represent his thinking on a subject that concerned and fascinated him throughout his career. He reflects on the wars against Iraq, the war in Kosovo, the Vietnam War, World War II, and on the meaning of war generally in a world of nations that can't seem to stop destroying each other. These readings appeared first in magazines and newspapers including the Progressive and the Boston Globe, as well as in Zinn's books, Failure to Quit, Vietnam: The Logic of Withdrawal, The Politics of History, and Declarations of Independence.

Here we see Zinn's perspective as a World War II veteran and peace activist who lived through the most devastating wars of the twentieth century and questioned every one of them with his combination of integrity and historical acumen. In his essay, "Just and Unjust War," Zinn challenges us to fight for justice "with struggle, but without war." He writes in "After the War" (2006) that while governments bring us into war, "their power is dependent on the obedience of the citizenry. When that is withdrawn, governments are helpless." In Howard Zinn on War, his message is clear: "The abolition of war has become not only desirable but absolutely necessary if the planet is to be saved. It is an idea whose time has come."

Read an excerpt on Issuu here

REVIEWS

"He's changed the conscience of America in a highly constructive way. I really can't think of anyone I can compare him to in this respect." —Noam Chomsky

"Howard had a genius for the shape of public morality and for articulating the great alternative vision of peace as more than a dream." —James Carroll, columnist for The Boston Globe

About Howard Zinn

The visionary historical work of professor and activist HOWARD ZINN (1922–2010) is widely considered one of the most important and influential of our era. After his experience as a bombardier in World War II, Zinn became convinced that there could no longer be such a thing as a "just war," because the vast majority of victims in modern warfare are, increasingly, innocent civilians. In his books, including A People's History of the United States, its companion volume Voices of a People's History of the United States, and countless other titles, Zinn affirms the power of the people to influence the course of events.

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