Other Septembers, Many Americas: Selected Provocations, 1980–2004
$16.95 $12.71
  • Paperback
  • 256
  • July 2004
  • 9781583226322

Other Septembers, Many Americas: Selected Provocations, 1980–2004

Ariel Dorfman

Here, in the tradition of Barbara Kingsolver's national bestseller Small Wonder, are reflections on the meaning of America in a time of great crisis by a writer uniquely situated to offer us a perspective that is both familiar and constantly surprising. "Let me tell you, America, of the hopes I had for you," Dorfman writes after the fall of the Twin Towers, remembering back to an earlier September 11 in 1973, when he was on the staff of Salvador Allende, then president of Chile, the day he was removed from office and murdered in a coup in which the U.S. government was complicit. "Beware the plague of victimhood, America … Nothing is more dangerous than a giant who is afraid."

Included in Other Septembers, Many Americas are major essays about the America south of the border, exploring the ambiguous relationship between power and literature and touching on topics as diverse as bilingualism, barbarians, and video games. In the essay "A Different Drum," Dorfman asks, "Isn't it time, as war approaches yet again, to tell each other stories of peace over and over again?" Over and over in these jewel-like essays, his best shorter work of the last quarter-century, Dorfman weaves together sentiment and politics with his sense of the larger historical questions, reminding Americans of our unique role in the world, so different from the one put forward by the current administration: the power to resist and to imagine.

REVIEWS

"Over the years, Ariel Dorfman has written movingly and often brilliantly of the cultural dislocations and political fractures of his dual heritage. Dorfman has, in an impressive body of work, done justice to the two languages that have battled for his voice and the two countries that claim his allegiance." —Shashi Tharoor, The New York Times Book Review

About Ariel Dorfman

Born in Buenos Aires in 1942, ARIEL DORFMAN is a Chilean citizen. A supporter of Salvador Allende, he was forced into exile and has lived in the United States for many years. Besides poetry, essays and novels Hard Rain (1990); Widows (1983); The Last Song of Manuel Sendero (1987); Mascara (1988); Konfidenz (1995). His plays include Death and the Maiden, which has been produced in over one hundred countries and made into a film by Roman Polanski. Dorfman has won many international awards, including the Sudamericana Award, the Laurence Olivier and two from the Kennedy Center, where Speak Truth to Power, his last play, recently premiered. He is distinguished professor at Duke University and lives in Durham, North Carolina.

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