Parable of the Sower & Parable of the Talents
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  • Hardcover: Boxed Set
  • 9781609807214

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Parable of the Sower & Parable of the Talents

Octavia E. Butler

Parable of the Sower is the Butlerian odyssey of one woman who is twice as feeling in a world that has become doubly dehumanized. The time is 2025. The place is California, where small walled communities must protect themselves from hordes of desperate scavengers and roaming bands of people addicted to a drug that activates an orgasmic desire to burn, rape, and murder. When one small community is overrun, Lauren Olamina, an 18 year old black woman with the hereditary trait of "hyperempathy" — which causes her to feel others’ pain as her own — sets off on foot along the dangerous coastal highways, moving north into the unknown.

Parable of the Talents celebrates the Butlerian themes of alienation and transcendence, violence and spirituality, slavery and freedom, separation and community, to astonishing effect, in the shockingly familiar, broken world of 2032. Long awaited, Parable of the Talents is the continuation of the travails of Lauren Olamina, the heroine of 1994's Nebula-Prize finalist, bestselling Parable of the Sower. Parable of the Talents is told in the voice of Lauren Olamina's daughter—from whom she has been separated for most of the girl's life—with sections in the form of Lauren's journal. Against a background of a war-torn continent, and with a far-right religious crusader in the office of the U.S. presidency, this is a book about a society whose very fabric has been torn asunder, and where the basic physical and emotional needs of people seem almost impossible to meet.

About Octavia E. Butler

"All that you touch you change." — Octavia E. Butler (1947–2006)

A writer who, in book after book, imagined richly the dark future for which we have destined ourselves and offered hope for improving it, OCTAVIA E. BUTLER is recognized as one of the bravest and smartest of American fiction writers. A 1995 MacArthur Award winner, Butler transcended genre even as she was awarded science fiction's top prizes, the Nebula and Hugo Awards. She reached readers of all ages, all races, all sexual persuasions. An impassioned voice for inclusion and early proponent of afrofuturism, Butler died in 2006 at the age of 58. She remains an inspiration to her international readership, which continues to grow, and has spawned several generations of devoted followers.

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